Kimber’s Micro 9 Rapide (Black Ice) Is Big on Attitude

https://www.rmef.org/elk-network/kimbers-micro-9-rapide-black-ice-is-big-on-attitude-2/

Kimber’s Micro 9 Rapide (Black Ice) has the same big attitude of the original, in a 9mm subcompact that’s like nothing else. The Micro 9™ version gives you all the enhancements, upgrades, and flair of the original 1911 Rapide (Black Ice), in a 9mm subcompact.

The Micro 9 Rapide (Black Ice) has a striking two-tone KimPro finish.

It features a stainless steel, match-grade 3.15-inch barrel, stepped cocking serrations and slide lightening cuts for quicker lock time. A distinctive V-shape patterned trigger and DLC coated barrel enhance performance.

A flush-fitting magwell and front-strap with Stiplex pattern help deliver a sure grip, and Tru-Glo TFX Pro day/night sights get shooters on target, making the Micro 9 Rapide (Black Ice) as big on performance as it is on style. Weighing just 15.6 ounces, it’s ideal for everyday carry.

Learn more at www.kimberamerica.com

The post Kimber’s Micro 9 Rapide (Black Ice) Is Big on Attitude appeared first on Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation.

Big plans for your harvest but don’t have the right tools for the job? Take advantage of the MEAT! Your Maker preseason sale.

https://www.rmef.org/elk-network/big-plans-for-your-harvest-but-dont-have-the-right-tools-for-the-job-take-advantage-of-the-meat-your-maker-preseason-sale/

Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation members have exclusive access to 25% OFF all MEAT! Your Maker products. Save BIG on grinders, sealers and more here this hunting season. For pro tips on how to break down game, check out The Bearded Butchers processing video.

The post Big plans for your harvest but don’t have the right tools for the job? Take advantage of the MEAT! Your Maker preseason sale. appeared first on Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation.

Smart Ideas for Year-End Giving – Three Elk-Worthy Hints

https://www.rmef.org/elk-network/smart-ideas-for-year-end-giving-elkworthy-hints/

This holiday season, take a moment and consider the gifts you would like to give. You can give a gift that goes a long way toward ensuring the future of elk and elk country.

When most of us think about giving a gift, we do so with cash, check or a credit card. However, there are other options to utilize while hanging on to your cash. You may also be able to make a greater gift than you ever thought possible. Here are four options:

  • Donor-Advised Fund – Recommend your gift to RMEF. Much like your own charitable savings account, this continues to be a popular way to give.
  • Appreciated stock – Avoid capital gains and receive an income tax deduction for the current value at the same time. This win-win is a simple way to make a donation.
  • IRA charitable rollover – Donate up to $100,000 without having to recognize it as income and it may keep you from bumping into a higher tax bracket. This is an easy way to make a meaningful gift while receiving a tax benefit at the same time and satisfy your required minimum distribution (RMD).

To learn more about fulfilling your year-end goals and assisting RMEF’s mission at the same time, contact us at 406-523-3479 or mtucker@rmef.org.

While these are suggestions or possibilities, it is important to note RMEF does not offer tax advice. And as always, RMEF recommends discussing options with your financial advisors before taking any action.

Turn your values into your legacy. Include RMEF as a beneficiary of your will, life insurance policy, retirement accounts, trust or annuity and be recognized in our esteemed Trails Society. Ensure generations will enjoy the wildlife and wild places that you treasure.

The post Smart Ideas for Year-End Giving – Three Elk-Worthy Hints appeared first on Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation.

Smart Ideas for Year-End Giving – Donor Advised Funds

https://www.rmef.org/elk-network/smart-ideas-for-year-end-giving-donor-advised-funds/

This holiday season, take a moment and consider the gifts you would like to give. You can give a gift that goes a long way toward ensuring the future of elk and elk country.

It’s fast, it’s popular, it’s easy and it’s like your own personal charitable savings account. Making a distribution from your Donor-Advised Fund (DAF) is a great way to support RMEF and its mission. Simply contact your sponsoring financial or community institution to recommend a grant to RMEF.

You may not take an income tax charitable deduction for this gift since you already received an income tax charitable deduction when you originally transferred the funds into the DAF at your sponsoring financial or community institution.

When establishing a DAF, you can also recommend that RMEF receive any remaining balance in the DAF upon your passing.

Contact RMEF (mtucker@rmef.org or 406-523-3479) if you have any questions. Your institution may not share your information and this allows us to track and recognize your donation.

While these are suggestions or possibilities, it is important to note RMEF does not offer tax advice. And as always, RMEF recommends discussing options with your financial advisors before taking any action.

Turn your values into your legacy. Include RMEF as a beneficiary of your will, life insurance policy, retirement accounts, trust or annuity and be recognized in our esteemed Trails Society. Ensure generations will enjoy the wildlife and wild places that you treasure.

The post Smart Ideas for Year-End Giving – Donor Advised Funds appeared first on Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation.

Smart Ideas for Year-End Giving – Individual Retirement Accounts

https://www.rmef.org/elk-network/smart-ideas-for-year-end-giving-individual-retirement-accounts/

This holiday season, take a moment and consider the gifts you would like to give. You can give a gift that goes a long way toward ensuring the future of elk and elk country.

Here are six letters that may spell out a great way for your charitable donation to help further the Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation’s mission: QCD & IRA. QCDs (qualified charitable distributions) are also known as IRA (individual retirement account) rollovers. If you own an IRA and you are at least 70 and a half years old at the time of the transfer, you are eligible. You request a payment go directly from your plan administrator to RMEF. It’s that easy. This approach is appealing to donors as you may receive a tax benefit whether or not you itemize your deductions. And it can satisfy your required minimum distribution (RMD).

Having said that, you may not take an income tax charitable deduction for this gift since that’s considered “double dipping,” a no-no since you did not pay taxes on the assets in the first place. The distribution is also excluded from your taxable income so it may prevent you from being bumped into a higher tax bracket since the distribution is excluded from their taxable income.

A QCD is a direct transfer from the plan administrator to your charity. It is not distributed to the plan owner. Therefore, it is a tax-free gift to charity. The QCD is already a popular way for donors to make their charitable gifts. With fewer individuals now itemizing, the number of these gifts continue to grow given their tax-advantaged nature and simplicity.

You can also include RMEF to receive any remaining balance or a percentage of your IRA upon your passing.

Contact RMEF (mtucker@rmef.org or 406-523-3479) if you have any questions or are making this type of gift. Plan administrators may not share their client’s information and this allows us to track and recognize your donation.

While these are suggestions or possibilities, it is important to note RMEF does not offer tax advice. And as always, RMEF recommends discussing options with your financial advisors before taking any action.

Turn your values into your legacy. Include RMEF as a beneficiary of your will, life insurance policy, retirement accounts, trust or annuity and be recognized in our esteemed Trails Society. Ensure generations will enjoy the wildlife and wild places that you treasure.

The post Smart Ideas for Year-End Giving – Individual Retirement Accounts appeared first on Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation.

Smart Ideas for Year-End Giving – Stocks/Securities Donation

https://www.rmef.org/elk-network/smart-ideas-for-year-end-giving-stocks-securities-donation/

This holiday season, take a moment and consider the gifts you would like to give. You can give a gift that goes a long way toward ensuring the future of elk and elk country.

Want to help RMEF further its mission and avoid taxes at the same time? Then giving the gift of stocks/securities may be just the win-win you’re looking for. If you do so, three things will happen:

  • You will receive recognition for the fair market value of the stock on the date RMEF receives ownership.
  • You will receive an immediate income tax deduction.
  • You will avoid tax on the gain.

For example, if you transfer stock valued at $10,000 and your basis is only $1,000, your gift will be recognized for $10,000 but you will avoid paying capital gains on $9,000.

If you held stock for a long time but it decreased in value, you may benefit more from selling the stock and then giving cash to RMEF.

Many folks choose to support RMEF through a gift of stock, and the process is quite simple. If interested, contact RMEF (mtucker@rmef.org or 406-523-3479) and we will provide you or your broker the DTC and account numbers for your transfer. Brokers may not share their client’s information and this allows us to track and recognize your donation.

While these are suggestions or possibilities, it is important to note RMEF does not offer tax advice. And as always, RMEF recommends discussing options with your financial advisors before taking any action.

Turn your values into your legacy. Include RMEF as a beneficiary of your will, life insurance policy, retirement accounts, trust or annuity and be recognized in our esteemed Trails Society. Ensure generations will enjoy the wildlife and wild places that you treasure.

The post Smart Ideas for Year-End Giving – Stocks/Securities Donation appeared first on Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation.

Utah DWR Launches Done Law Enforcement Team

https://www.rmef.org/elk-network/utah-dwr-launches-done-law-enforcement-team/

Below is a news release from the Utah Division of Wildlife Resources. For 2022, Fiocchi partnered with the Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation to increase the visibility of poaching incidents in an effort to reduce poaching nationwide.

In an effort to expand its law enforcement investigative methods, the Utah Division of Wildlife Resources recently launched its first conservation officer drone team.

The new Unmanned Aerial Systems team had to complete various licensing and training requirements with the Federal Aviation Administration in order to become certified to operate drones for law enforcement work. There are currently five investigators assigned to the drone team, and they are located throughout the state.

“Using drones will help us more effectively solve wildlife crimes, and having trained law enforcement drone pilots will also allow us to assist other law enforcement agencies with search-and-rescue efforts or any other investigations,” DWR Captain Wade Hovinga said. “Utah conservation officers are public servants, and these new tools will help us better serve the public, whether we’re solving poaching crimes or locating lost hunters.”

Similar to the K-9 conservation officer team, these specialized drone officers will be called to assist with a variety of things, including:

  • Documenting crime scenes.
  • Searching for evidence and locating illegally taken wildlife.
  • Assisting landowners by investigating illegal trespassing on private property.
  • Helping other law enforcement agencies with search-and-rescue efforts.
  • Assisting biologists with wildlife surveys.
  • Documenting boating accidents (available to assist, if asked).
  • Investigating hunting-related shooting incidents.
  • Investigating wildlife/human encounters.

Conservation officers concentrate their efforts on enforcing wildlife laws and ensuring compliance with those regulations. They also educate and protect the recreating public, and work to promote the value of wildlife for everyone in Utah. DWR conservation officers also increasingly respond to non-wildlife-related criminal code violations and are often requested to assist local law enforcement agencies. Some of their job duties include:

  • Patrolling Utah’s mountains and lakes, investigating wildlife-related violations. (Conservation officers patrol on foot, horseback, motorcycles, ATVs, boats and in trucks.)
  • Assisting biologists with studies and surveys to help inform management decisions.
  • Removing nuisance wildlife from urban areas.
  • Helping other agencies with various investigations and enforcement.
  • Assisting in search-and-rescue missions, wildfire evacuations and other emergency response efforts.
  • Helping with Hunter Education, teaching new hunters about how to be responsible and ethical.
  • Enforcing all of Utah’s laws.

(Photo credit: Utah Division of Wildlife Resources)

The post Utah DWR Launches Done Law Enforcement Team appeared first on Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation.

Wyoming Film Highlights Ranchers’ Role in Wildlife Conservation

https://www.rmef.org/elk-network/wyoming-film-highlights-ranchers-role-in-wildlife-conservation/

Below is a news release from the University of Wyoming.

A new documentary series highlighting ranching families that have gone to exceptional lengths to preserve Western ranching and steward big-game populations will be screened in Laramie Thursday, Sept. 22.

The three-part series, “My Wild Land,” will be shown starting at 6 p.m. at the Gryphon Theatre. Doors open at 5:30 p.m. The screening, free and open to the public, is hosted by the Wyoming Stock Growers Land Trust and the University of Wyoming’s Wyoming Migration Initiative.

The event will include a free raffle; a question-and-answer session with ranchers and other partners working to maintain Wyoming’s working lands; and a social hour with free food and beverages.

The documentary features ranches from across Wyoming: the Terry Creek Ranch near Laramie, the Bischoff Ranch near Lovell and the Hellyer family ranch near Lander. The series, presented by the Muley Fanatic Foundation with support from the outdoor equipment company Maven and produced by the Wyoming Migration Initiative, was launched in response to the rapid residential growth of Western states in recent years and subsequent loss of wildlife habitat.

Each film shares the unique perspective of the landowners; their relationship to the land; and the challenges they’ve faced while maintaining cattle operations and promoting wildlife habitat.

Also supporting the screening is the Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation.

To view the film trailers, visit https://vimeo.com/showcase/mywild.

(Photo credit: University of Wyoming)

The post Wyoming Film Highlights Ranchers’ Role in Wildlife Conservation appeared first on Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation.

Trail Cam Captures Unicorn Elk Photo

https://www.rmef.org/elk-network/trail-cam-captures-unicorn-elk-photo/

It’s just not something you see every day. A trail camera in central Washington recently captured an image of what some call a unicorn elk. Of course, it’s not really a unicorn but it does have what would/should be its left antler instead coming out of the middle of its head right between the eyes. How does that happen?

Digging through the archives of the Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation’s Bugle magazine shows trauma is the most common factor. If a velvet tine is bumped or broken but still attached to the beam, it can grow at wide angles, forming peculiar “kickstands” or other irregularities. And it may very well remain that way for the rest of their lives.

Scientific evidence also links damage to an animal’s body and its antler growth. For example, an injury to an animal’s left shoulder will typically result in a rack malformed on the right side. Biologists speculate that this relationship is a structural adaptation of the head to reestablish bilateral balance. Injury to an animal’s testicles both in velvet and bone stages, can produce antlers that are never shed.

Other primary factors are genetics and nutrition. Genetic mutations, such as forked dagger tines, are passed along from generation to generation and become either commonplace – and subject to further mutation of shape – or the exception, eliminated through natural selectin. Abundance of forage can produce massive well-developed antlers, while lack of forage stunts antler growth.

(Photo credit: David Kauer)

The post Trail Cam Captures Unicorn Elk Photo appeared first on Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation.

New Mapping Tool Offers CWD Info to Hunters

https://www.rmef.org/elk-network/new-mapping-tool-offers-cwd-info-to-hunters/

Hunters have a new tool to help them negotiate an ever-changing landscape featuring chronic wasting disease (CWD), an always-fatal nervous system disease found in deer, elk, moose and other cervids spreading across the United States and Canada.

The CWD Alliance recently unveiled an interactive map that allows hunters to view CWD areas, regulatory CWD status and hunting regulations on a state-by-state basis. The tool will help hunters better understand restrictions about the movement of cervid carcasses to or from states where they hunt or live.

While the Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation did not contribute directly to this project, it did provide a supportive role through the CWD Alliance, of which it is a sponsor and founding member dating back to 2002.

In early 2022, RMEF announced it allocated $100,000 in grant funding to help CWD research. That grant combines with those of other contributors to total nearly $450,000 specifically for 2022 CWD research.

(Photo credit: CWD Alliance)

The post New Mapping Tool Offers CWD Info to Hunters appeared first on Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation.