Choosing the right size wall tent

https://www.rmef.org/elk-network/choosing-the-right-size-wall-tent/

People ask us every day “what size wall tent should I buy”? In order to answer that question, we need to understand a little bit about how they plan to use their tent.

So, questions like “how many people will be sleeping in your tent” and ”will you be cooking and eating in your tent”? These two simple questions will give us a good understanding of what size tent will serve you best.

On the other hand, you can get a good idea of the tent size you need by taking a tape measure and chalk outside to your driveway or in a parking lot. Just measure out, say 12×15, and draw it with chalk. Then, go ahead and add in cots. Most of the time in tents 14×15 or smaller, cots will be positioned so the head of the cot is against the back wall. Remember when drawing cots, you must have enough room between cots to store your clothes and gear under the cots. After drawing in your cots, draw where your stove will go. For Davis Tents, our stove jacks are located in the front left as you walk into the tent. And then of course, draw  in tables or any other items you may plan to have inside your tent.

For a general rule that works for most people:

  • A 10×10 tent is for 1 or 2 people
  • A 12×15 tent is for 2 or 3 people
  • A 14×15 tent is for 3 or 4 people
  • And larger groups are covered by our 16×20 and 16×25 tents

If you have further questions, shoot us an email or give us a call and we will help you in any way we can. Visit us at www.davistent.com.

(303) 561-1817 or (877) 355-2267
Sales@DavisTent.com

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3 Things To Help Choose Which Suppressor Is Best For You

https://www.rmef.org/elk-network/3-things-to-help-choose-which-suppressor-is-best-for-you/

Suppressors are an investment, both in terms of money and your own physical well-being. You only get one set of ears, so your hearing is a precious commodity that you need to take care of. Unfortunately, suppressors are not inexpensive, so like any other time you’re considering how you’re going to invest your money, it’s wise to do your research first and be extra sure of where you’re spending your money.

With the help of Silencer Central, we’ll go over some of the key things you should consider to help you decide what suppressor is right for you and your specific needs.

  1. What Will the Suppressor Be Used For?

Determining how you’re going to use your suppressor is the first step in picking one out. Certain suppressors are geared toward one or maybe two applications and they do them very well. Other suppressors are more multi-faceted and are suited to a wider variety of types of shooting.

  • Big Game Hunting
  • Long-Range Shooting
  • Shotgun Sports/Hunting

Once you determine what you’ll be using the suppressor for, you can start narrowing down your choices.

  1. The Material of the Suppressor

A lot of time and energy goes into every aspect of silencer design, not the least of which is determining which materials to use. Picking the right combination is critical for performance, weight, durability, longevity, balance, and more.

  • Aluminum is often used in suppressor construction because of how light the weight of it is. When it comes to suppressors, every ounce or fraction of an ounce adds up, and the more they weigh, the more you’ll feel it hanging out there on the end of your barrel. While aluminum may be beneficial because of its weight, its main drawback is durability. An aluminum suppressor and its components won’t hold up as well over time as a suppressor made out of a stronger material like steel.
  • Steel is one of the most common materials used in suppressor construction. The main benefit of using steel is its strength. Many items that have to be durable are made of steel, so it makes sense that suppressors would be made of it, too. However, the big drawback with steel is weight. The fact of the matter is that steel is heavy. Depending on how you’ll be using your new suppressor, the weight of it may not be of much concern to you. Again, it all depends on how you’ll be using the suppressor.
  • Titanium is a great material for suppressor construction. You get the best of both worlds in terms of the materials listed above.https://www.silencercentral.com/blog/titanium-vs-stainless-steel-suppressors/ Titanium offers the strength and durability of steel with the lightweight properties of aluminum. Essentially, you get a rock-solid suppressor built out of an incredibly durable material that will last a lifetime, but you won’t have to sacrifice additional weight because titanium offers exceptional strength at a surprisingly lightweight.

  1. The Type of Gun You Have

The type of gun you have will also play a role in determining the kind of suppressor you should get. You can’t use a rifle or pistol suppressor on a shotgun, or vice versa. However, you can use some rifle and pistol suppressors interchangeably, but make sure you read your owner’s manual first to be absolutely sure. The only type of gun that you cannot use a suppressor on is a revolver – with the exception of just a couple of late-19th and early-20th century gas seal models.

From here, talk to friends and fellow shooters, chat with the staff at your local gun shop, hop on some internet forums, and soak up as much info as you can.

When you’re ready to purchase your suppressor, give Silencer Central a call. They’ll walk you through the entire purchase, file all of the paperwork for you, get you squared away with a free gun trust, break up your purchase into interest free payments and ship it right to your door once it’s been approved. It doesn’t get any better than that!

Silencer Central can help you select the best suppressor that fits your gun(s) and interests, both with their Banish line of suppressors and a full assortment from other manufacturers.

Let Silencer Central help you get started and set you up on a free National Firearms Act (NFA) gun trust and you will be hunting suppressed before you know it.

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Fresh tactics for Elk, Antelope and Moose from Montana Decoy

https://www.rmef.org/elk-network/fresh-tactics-for-elk-antelope-and-moose-from-montana-decoy/

Fall is just around the corner and now is the time to plan and prepare to up your odds. In this year’s Big Game decoy Guide we’ll share some all new decoy and hunting tips that cover a wide range of elk and other big game.

The 2022 Big Game Guide is here! We’ve created four new big game scenarios for those who are planning to hunt antelope, elk, or moose this coming fall. Plus, we’ve introduced custom decoys for those truly unique animals you might hunt once in a lifetime. No matter what or where you’re hunting this season, make it your best one yet.

Guide Includes

Four new scenarios for antelope, elk, and moose.

Information about our custom decoy program.

Use code BIGGAME2022 to receive 15% off select Big Game Decoys.

Visit :  https://montanadecoy.com/2022-big-game-decoy-guide/ to learn more.

 

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Knock Knock, Who’s There?

https://www.rmef.org/elk-network/knock-knock-whos-there/

Below is a Facebook post from the Arizona Game and Fish Department (AZGFD).

A mother elk left her youngster on this doorstep at a Pine, Arizona, residence. The surprised homeowners did the right thing and left it there, undisturbed. They called AZGFD for advice, thinking that the calf was abandoned or injured, and learned that it was perfectly fine. Although calves are usually left in a more natural setting such as a grassy meadow, the responding AZGFD Officer jokes, “Mom left it there for ‘daycare’ in the early morning, and came back to pick it up after lunch.”

While this story has a happy ending, this spring AZGFD has responded to several situations in northern Arizona where residents had already removed elk calves from where their parents left them bedded down for the day while they foraged for food. It is usually difficult to reunite them with their parents in these cases. In addition, a cow elk watching from a distance may become aggressive when defending her young, which can quickly put those with good intentions in danger.

AZGFD urges Arizonans to leave baby wildlife – including elk calves – alone. If you encounter an animal that appears to be sick or injured, is unresponsive or lethargic, please contact your nearest licensed wildlife rehabilitation facility or call your local AZGFD office first.

(Photo credit:  Arizona Game and Fish Department)

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Elk, Bears, Birds Quench Thirst at Wyoming Wildlife Guzzler

https://www.rmef.org/elk-network/elk-bears-birds-quench-thirst-at-wyoming-wildlife-guzzler/

A series of videos posted by the Bureau of Land Management–Wyoming Facebook page shows the benefit of wildlife water guzzlers. Three BLM videos posted over a five-day period show a bull elk, a young black bear and a turkey vulture stopping to take a sip at the guzzler on Rattlesnake Mountain about 20 miles west of Cody, Wyoming.

According to the BLM, the federal agency’s Cody Field Office, Wyoming Game and Fish Department and Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation joined forces in 2019 to build the guzzler.

Lying on the eastern edge of the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem, Rattlesnake Mountain provides year-round habitat for an abundance of wildlife including elk, moose, mule deer, whitetail deer, black bear, grizzly bear, blue grouse and turkey. Although the mountain receives 15″-19″ of precipitation each year, the lack of available surface water during the summer and fall makes it difficult for wildlife to utilize the high-quality habitat during the dry season.

Go here to watch a nice bull elk pause to take a drink.

(Photo credit:  Bureau of Land Management – Wyoming)

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Elk Calf Rescued from the Ashes of New Mexico Wildfire

https://www.rmef.org/elk-network/elk-calf-rescued-from-the-ashes-of-new-mexico-wildfire/

A wildfire crew from Missoula, Montana, working a massive 316,000-acre wildfire in northcentral New Mexico, came across a lone elk calf while searching for hot spots.

“She was lying quietly in a six-inch deep layer of white ash, surrounded by the blackened remains of fir trees,” firefighter Nate Sink said in a Facebook post.

The crew observed the calf for an hour hoping the mother would return. Finding no adult tracks, they took it to a nearby ranching family and followed the advice of a family veterinarian to offer the young elk a mixture of condensed milk and water until they could get some specially formulated milk.

The calf is now at a refuge under the care of a surrogate-mother elk and will be released into the wild in a few months.

Go here to read the Facebook post and view additional photos.

(Photo credit:  Calf Canyon and Hermits Peak Fire)

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NC Governor, Students, RMEF Talk Wildlife Crossings

https://www.rmef.org/elk-network/nc-governor-students-rmef-talk-wildlife-crossings/

The Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation recently took a seat at the table with North Carolina Governor Roy Cooper and others to talk about the importance of wildlife crossings. Fifth grade students from a K-12 charter school in Fletcher, a small town about 40 miles east of North Carolina’s elk zone, hand-delivered letters to the governor about the I-40 Pigeon River Gorge Wildlife Crossing Project that seeks to help animals safely cross the busy highway.

“RMEF and partners were thrilled to sit down with Governor Cooper to advocate for wildlife crossing projects on Interstate 40 through North Carolina’s elk zone,” said Steven Dobey, RMEF conservation program manager, eastern U.S. “These efforts would bolster the long-term survival of this growing elk herd and make a North Carolina a leader in national efforts make highways safer for drivers and wildlife.”

RMEF recently purchased remote cameras used to monitor wildlife crossing points along a 26-mile stretch of I-40 through North Carolina’s elk country.

“North Carolina can be a leader in national efforts to identify and implement wildlife crossing projects to benefit elk and other wildlife. Doing so could improve safety for drivers while also protecting these natural resources that that annually bring millions of tourism-related dollars to local economies in Cherokee, Maggie Valley and Asheville,” added Dobey (third from right in bottom photo).

RMEF has a long history of conservation accomplishment in North Carolina. Since 1995, RMEF and its partners completed 126 conservation and hunting heritage outreach projects in the state with a combined value of more than $4.9 million. These projects conserved and enhanced 4,860 acres of habitat and opened or improved public access to 1,925 acres. One of those projects dates back to 2001-2002 when RMEF provided funding support to help successfully restore wild elk to their historic range in Great Smoky Mountains National Park.

(Group photo credit:  Jerry Greer/National Parks Conservation Association)

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Minnesota Elk Habitat Gets Upgrade

https://www.rmef.org/elk-network/minnesota-elk-habitat-gets-upgrade/

MISSOULA, Mont. — The Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation and its partners allocated $85,773 in grant funding for habitat enhancement and hunting heritage projects in Minnesota. RMEF directly granted $20,093 that leveraged an additional $65,680 in partner dollars.

“This work positively impacts habitat for elk, moose, deer and other wildlife across more than 1,000 acres in seven different counties. It also helps youth and adults alike better experience and understand hunting, conservation, recreational shooting and the outdoors.” said Blake Henning, RMEF chief conservation officer.

There are more than 7,400 RMEF members and 19 chapters in Minnesota.

“We appreciate our volunteers who worked hard to generate this funding so it can go back on the ground in the state they live,” said Kyle Weaver, RMEF president and CEO.

Below is a list of Minnesota projects benefitted by 2021 funding, shown by county.

Kittson County

  • Establish and maintain quality forage plots across 50 acres within select wildlife management areas (WMA) and private lands in the Karlstad area.

Marshall County

  • Shear 500 acres of over-mature brushland to trigger the resprouting of early successional new growth within the Thief Lake WMA (also benefits Beltrami County).
  • Sheer 500 acres of brush within the Grygla, Moose River, Thief Lake and Wapiti WMAs and create five miles of firebreak to prepare units for future prescribed burning.

Nicollet County

  • Provide funding and volunteer manpower to support the 2021 Minnesota Outdoor Youth Activity Day for nearly 200 boys and girls to learn about conservation and take part in more than 40 hands-on skills including archery, trap and muzzleloader shooting, bowfishing, cooking and more.

Scott County

  • Provide funding for a three-day mentored pheasant hunt workshop for women including instruction in shotgun basics and safety, working with dogs and other skills (also benefits Le Sueur and Pine Counties).

Statewide

  • Provide funding to assist the 2022 Minnesota State High School Clay Target League Trap Shooting Championship. More than 340 high school teams and 8,000 student athletes are expected to participate.

Since 1990, RMEF and its partners completed 226 conservation and hunting heritage outreach projects in Minnesota with a combined value of more than $5.3 million. These projects conserved and enhanced 80,423 acres of habitat and opened or improved public access to 943 acres.

Project partners include the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources as well as conservation, hunting and other organizations.

About the Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation:

Founded more than 38 years ago and fueled by hunters, RMEF maintains more than 225,000 members and has conserved nearly 8.4 million acres for elk and other wildlife. RMEF also works to open and improve public access, fund and advocate for science-based resource management, and ensure the future of America’s hunting heritage. Discover why “Hunting Is Conservation™” at rmef.org or 800-CALL ELK.

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The Outdoors are Calling – Outdoor Class Online Learning Platform

https://www.rmef.org/elk-network/the-outdoors-are-calling-outdoor-class-online-learning-platform/

For hunters committed to improving their skills, OutdoorClass is the only subscription-based, e-learning platform that provides unlimited access to video lessons from the world’s most respected experts, covering topics across the hunter’s entire journey. Whether you’re on your phone, computer or TV, you’ll have access whether at home or in the field.

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Online Learning Platform ‘OutdoorClass’ Unveiled for Experienced, Novice Hunters Alike

https://www.rmef.org/elk-network/online-learning-platform-outdoorclass-unveiled-for-experienced-novice-hunters-alike/

MISSOULA, Mont. —  The Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation, GOHUNT, Randy Newberg and Corey Jacobsen, as partners, are proud to unveil OutdoorClass, an online learning hub unlike any other for hunters of all experience and skill levels.

“We are excited to be a partner on and announce this cutting-edge educational endeavor designed for hunters,” said Kyle Weaver, RMEF president and CEO. “This platform is centered on instruction and mentorship for those new to hunting as well as nuanced insights and techniques for those who have hunted for decades.”

OutdoorClass will launch with four multi-chapter courses on any device taught by Jacobsen, Newberg, Remi Warren and Jaime Teigen who break down early and late season elk hunting, mule deer hunting and wild game cooking. With many hours of content, this subscription-based offering provides unlimited viewing of all courses.

“Our production value is second to none,” says GOHUNT President and Co-founder Chris Porter. “Besides the skill and knowledge of our experts, our courses use detailed graphics and video to show subscribers exactly what to do, which is so much more valuable than just telling them. This attention to detail is what separates OutdoorClass from anything else that is out there today.”

New courses are slated throughout 2022, taught by experts Ryan Lampers, Brian Call, Hank Shaw and John Barklow. Each course requires weeks of filming and well over 1,500 hours of editing to produce. Over time, OutdoorClass will grow to include backcountry survival skills, marksmanship, E-scouting, drawing tags and hunting multiple species of game, among others.

“Every RMEF member and every elk hunter could benefit from OutdoorClass,” says Newberg, public lands advocate and RMEF life member. “The most valuable investment you can make is in yourself and in your knowledge set. I can think of no better investment for a hunter hungry to keep learning and growing.”

“It’s a one-place platform where people can go and know that they’re going to get expert education from people who are leaders in their categories,” says Jacobsen, 10-time world elk calling champion and RMEF life member.

OutdoorClass may be accessed through OutdoorClass.com and available for an annual fee of $99.99. RMEF members will receive a 20 percent discount when they sign up using the code RMEF.

About the Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation:

Founded more than 38 years ago and fueled by hunters, RMEF maintains more than 225,000 members and has conserved nearly 8.4 million acres for elk and other wildlife. RMEF also works to open and improve public access, fund and advocate for science-based resource management, and ensure the future of America’s hunting heritage. Discover why “Hunting Is Conservation™” at rmef.org or 800-CALL ELK.

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