Idaho Rockslide or Avalanche Kills 15+ Elk

https://www.rmef.org/elk-network/idaho-rockslide-or-avalanche-kills-15-elk/

Below is a news release from the Idaho Department of Fish and Game. Go to the news release link to see additional photos.

Idaho Fish and Game uses data from radio collars to get a better understanding of wildlife survivability. Data generated from the GPS collars give wildlife staff the ability to track where collared individuals are located, their movement patterns, and potentially where and, in some cases, how they die. When an animal is suspected to have died, Idaho Department of Fish and Game staff goes to the site of the last location and gathers data to determine cause of death.

Elk is one of the wildlife species monitored on Craig Mountain WMA, in game management unit 11. Earlier this year, a mortality signal was received from a radio collared elk on Craig Mountain. With the data and GPS location provided by the collar, wildlife staff were able to navigate to the location of the collar. When wildlife staff arrived at the location of the radio collar, they discovered the surprising but unfortunate story of what had occurred. With scree material and boulders up to the size of beach balls, it appeared that at least 15 elk were traversing and side hilling near the top of a ridgeline only to be caught up in a landslide. Bringing them down almost 1,000 feet over just a distance of 300-400 yards, this group of elk was caught up in rubble and snow ultimately resulting in death.

Thorough investigation through rock and debris allowed Idaho Fish and Game staff to gather data from 4 recovered radio collars. Natural events such as avalanches and rockslides often occur without being observed and it is generally unknown how these events influence wildlife. This event provides evidence that natural events such as this can influence a wildlife population. Collars placed on multiple species across the state over the span of months and years, allow Idaho Department of Fish and Game to inform management decisions on preserving, protecting, and perpetuating wildlife for continued use and enjoyment of the public.

(Video credit: Idaho Department of Fish and Game)

The post Idaho Rockslide or Avalanche Kills 15+ Elk appeared first on Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation.

Montana Wolf Population Remains Stable Through 2021

https://www.rmef.org/elk-network/montana-wolf-population-remains-stable-through-2021/

Below is a news release from Montana Fish, Wildlife and Parks.

Wolf numbers and distribution continue to be stable across Montana, according to numbers released Monday in the 2021 Montana Fish, Wildlife & Parks Wolf Report.

“What the data shows us really isn’t surprising,” said FWP Director Hank Worsech. “Our management of wolves, including ample hunting and trapping opportunities, have kept numbers at a relatively stable level during the past several years.”

In understanding this report, people must keep in mind that population trends are monitored by the calendar year, in this case 2021, which is consistent with how FWP and other agencies have tracked wolf populations since the 1980s and how wolf populations are tracked in other areas. However, the wolf hunting and trapping season ended March 15, 2022. The harvest realized during this first three months of 2022 isn’t reflected in the 2021 wolf population estimate.

Another interesting aspect of the data is that wolf trapping efforts were down this license year from past years. This means fewer trappers were on the landscape. Potential reasons for this include unfavorable weather conditions during the trapping season.

The 2021 Montana Legislature approved a suite of legislation that added more tools for hunters and trappers for harvesting wolves. The legislature also passed legislation directing FWP to manage wolves in a manner that would reduce numbers to a sustainable level above minimum recovery goals.

In response, the Fish and Wildlife Commission increased bag limits, allowed snaring outside of lynx protection zones, and extended the season. Additionally, the commission also set harvest threshold numbers in each FWP region and at a statewide scale that required them to reconvene if those harvest levels were met. Ultimately, the commission closed wolf season in southwest Montana early because the pre-established threshold was met.

“We are following the law,” Worsech said. “And are doing so in a way that provides certainty that wolf populations in Montana will remain off the Endangered Species List.”

By the numbers

The estimated wolf population in Montana at the end of 2021 is 1,144. This is down 40 wolves from 1,181 in 2020. This is not a statistically significant difference. In the last 10 years, wolf populations saw an estimated high of 1,256 in 2011 and a low of 1,113 in 2017. The small difference in these two numbers demonstrates a population trend that is very stable.

At the end of 2021, Montana had an estimated 192 wolf packs. This is down from an estimated 198 in 2020. In the last 10 years, estimated pack numbers have fluctuated from a high of 205 in 2012 to a low of 186 in 2017.

Methodology

FWP employed new population estimation methodology in 2007, called integrated patch occupancy model (iPOM). This methodology has undergone a scientific peer review both of its individual components and the cumulative process as a whole.

iPOM pulls together a variety of different sources of data, including information from FWP biologists, to produce population and distribution estimates. Another important source of data comes from hunter harvest surveys that are conducted by FWP every year. These surveys ask deer and elk hunters if they saw wolves while hunting and, if so, where. These surveys are done after hunting season and are necessary to make an accurate estimate.

(Photo credit: Montana Fish, Wildlife and Parks)

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New RMEF-Assisted Colorado Overpass Provides Safe Passage for Elk, Other Wildlife

https://www.rmef.org/elk-network/new-rmef-assisted-colorado-overpass-provides-safe-passage-for-elk-other-wildlife/

Below is a news release from the Colorado Department of Transportation.

The Colorado Department of Transportation recently completed the state’s newest wildlife overpass and underpass on U.S. Highway 160 between Durango and Pagosa Springs in southwest Colorado. The wildlife mitigation project will enhance safety for this section of the highway by promoting safer travel for motorists, enhancing the safer movement of wildlife, and reducing wildlife-vehicle collisions.

Last week CDOT hosted a ribbon-cutting celebration atop the wildlife arch over the highway. The event highlighted the benefits of the project and recognized the partnerships among government agencies, public organizations, nonprofit groups, and private individuals that made the project possible.

“This crossing not only improves safety for our state’s wildlife―animals like mule deer, elk, and bears―but it secures protection for Coloradans in their vehicles,” said Marlon Reis, Colorado’s First Gentleman.

More than 60% of all crashes in the project area are attributed to wildlife-vehicle collisions. Without the mitigation treatment, these numbers were expected to grow as wildlife-vehicle crashes continue to show an increasing trend since 2012. The project’s wildlife safety features are expected to reduce those wildlife-vehicle collisions by 85%.

A busy highway can be a barrier to wildlife movement. To help big game find their way across the road, a wildlife overpass was recently built over U.S. Highway 160 in southwest Colorado. The project also included an animal underpass, two miles of exclusion fencing, several earthen escape ramps, and a deer guard at the CO Highway 151 junction.

Collaborative efforts have leveraged this and other wildlife mitigation projects in Colorado, making the construction of these highway features more feasible for CDOT. While many agencies and organizations come forward with valuable project funding, other contributions from various entities may include resources like studies, research, and development plans. For example, the Southern Ute Indian Tribe provided support with critical Global Positioning System data which identified seasonal migration patterns and habitat for mule deer and elk in the San Juan Basin area.

“Nineteen years ago, the tribe deployed its first set of GPS radio collars on mule deer. The results of those collars hinted at the importance of this particular spot and stretch (of roadway) as a migratory crossing point (for big game) on Highway 160,” said Aran Johnson, Southern Ute tribal wildlife biologist.

Partners involved in the U.S. 160 wildlife crossings project include:

  • Colorado Department of Transportation ($9.458 million)
  • Southern Ute Indian Tribe ($1.3 million, studies, and research)
  • Colorado Parks and Wildlife ($750,000, studies, and research)
  • National Fish and Wildlife Foundation ($317,000)
  • Mule Deer Foundation ($100,000 via a private donor, in memory of Glen E. Grush, Bayfield, CO)
  • Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation ($75,000)
  • Federal Highway Administration (administration of federal aid & safety funding)
  • Colorado Wildlife & Transportation Alliance (partnership & fundraising development)

Project Background

The construction project was awarded to Ralph L. Wadsworth Construction Co. of Utah. The total cost of the project is approximately $12 million, including design and planning. The two-season construction began in March 2021 and was completed in July 2022. Project features include:

  • Wildlife underpass structure just west of the CO 151 intersection at MP 126.8
  • Wildlife overpass structure just east of the CO 151 intersection at MP 127.3
  • Two miles of 8-foot-tall exclusion fence along both sides of U.S. Hwy 160 from MP 126 – 128
  • Earthen escape ramps
  • A deer guard at the CO 151 junction
  • 8-foot-tall gates

The project also involved highway improvements of a new resurfacing treatment for two miles, an extension of the existing westbound passing lane on U.S. 160, and a new westbound left-turn acceleration lane, both on U.S. 160 to enhance intersection access onto and off of CO 151.

CDOT has built more than 60 wildlife mitigation structures crossing above or under highways throughout the state. Additionally, 400 miles of high big game fencing have been installed along state and U.S. highways or next to the interstates. The agency’s Planning and Environmental division continues to seek opportunities to incorporate wildlife mitigation features into future highway construction projects.

(Photo credit: Colorado Department of Transportation)

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RMEF Recognized for Conservation Work in Wyoming

https://www.rmef.org/elk-network/rmef-recognized-for-conservation-work-in-wyoming/

The Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation gets a lot of attention in and around the state of Wyoming – and for good reason! Now it received some more. The Wyoming Department of Game and Fish highlighted its successful partnership with RMEF in its just released 2021 Statewide Habitat Plan Annual Report.

“RMEF is a common partner for habitat restoration, conservation easements, land acquisition and public access across the state,” wrote Brian Nesvik, Game and Fish director. “In addition to financial support, RMEF volunteers often contribute to on-the-ground project implementation. Thank you, RMEF, for your ongoing commitment to habitats!”

The report highlights RMEF’s contributions in 13 different 2021 projects including its part with the purchase of an access agreement that improved public access for hunters, anglers and others to nearly 33,000 acres of previously difficult to reach public land in the Sublette Mountain Range of western Wyoming.

Other collaborative projects mentioned included funding for two research efforts and an array of habitat enhancement work such as the removal of decadent mountain mahogany, improving riparian habitat near streams and in wetlands, installing wildlife-friendly fencing, enhancing aspen stands, stabilizing creek banks to reduce erosion, fighting invasive weed species and other projects.

In 2021, Wyoming’s conservation partners invested $10.5 million toward 226 different habitat projects statewide to benefit more than 800 species.

“Quality habitat is a cornerstone of wildlife management,” said Nesvik. “That’s why the Wyoming Game and Fish Department continues to invest heartily to sustain wild and healthy populations of aquatic and terrestrial wildlife.”

Since 1986, RMEF and its partners completed 892 conservation and hunting heritage outreach projects in Wyoming with a combined value of more than $175.9 million. These projects conserved and enhanced 1,261,048 acres of habitat and opened or improved public access to 200,696 acres.

(Photo credit: Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation)

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Utah Offers New Trial Hunting Program

https://www.rmef.org/elk-network/utah-offers-new-trial-hunting-program/

Below is a news release from the Utah Division of Wildlife Resources.

If you are interested in trying hunting for the first time this fall or winter or if you’d like to learn how to use a trap, you’ll need to look into either taking a hunter education class or participating in the Trial Hunting Program. If you’ve never taken hunter education or a furharvester course, rest assured that it isn’t too late; but don’t put it off because classes fill up quickly!

January and February are the most popular months for hunter education courses, so people can apply for the big game hunt drawing. The next-busiest months are July and August, right before the fall general-season big game hunts.

To hunt in Utah, everyone born after Dec. 31, 1965, must complete a state-offered hunter education class or participate in the Trial Hunting Program. Here’s what you need to know to enroll in either:

HOW TO TAKE A HUNTER EDUCATION COURSE

You have the option of taking a traditional in-person class led by an instructor or an online course followed by an in-person field day. Both options include a final written test and the “field day” with hands-on skills demonstration and a live-fire shooting exercise at the end.

The online course will teach you about firearm safety, hunter responsibility and ethics. It can be taken at your own pace. The online course costs $25, and you can register on the Utah Hunter Education webpage.

“If you have a young child who’s taking the course, you can help them understand what they’re learning by sitting with them and discussing the course material as they go through it,” RaLynne Takeda, hunter education program manager for the Utah Division of Wildlife Resources, said. “Your child can also take the course at their own speed, and they can go back and review the material as often as they’d like.”

The instructor will provide additional details about the field day after you register for the online hunter education course. Once you finish the online portion of the course, you’ll print your proof-of-completion document. Then, you can buy a hunter education registration certificate online. The certificate costs $10 and is required before you can do the field day.

TRIAL HUNTING PROGRAM

Utah’s Trial Hunting Program is another way to get in the field this fall. The program gives you a chance to try hunting with an experienced hunter and see if it is something you’d like to pursue. You are not required to take hunter education to participate in this program.

You must be at least 12 years old to join the program. You just need to be accompanied by a licensed hunter who is 21 or older. To participate, you must complete a brief online orientation course, which can be found on the DWR website. You also need to buy a hunting license and the permit for the species you’d like to hunt. In this program, you are eligible to obtain the following licenses and permits:

  • Combination or hunting licenses (good for hunting all small game, including upland game and waterfowl)
  • General-season deer and elk permits
  • Permits to hunt bear, cougar, greater sage-grouse, sandhill crane, sharp-tailed grouse, swan and turkey

You can learn more about the program on the DWR website.

“Both of these are great ways to get started in hunting, a sport that not only allows you to get fresh, locally sourced meat, but also gives you a unique opportunity to get outdoors and make memories with your family,” Takeda said. “Hunting is also an important tool in managing healthy wildlife populations.”

HOW TO TAKE A FUR HARVESTER EDUCATION COURSE

To trap wildlife in Utah, everyone born after Dec. 31, 1984, must complete a state-offered fur harvester education course. The fur harvester education course provides instructions on the following:

  • Safe, responsible and ethical trapping methods
  • How to use trapping devices
  • Trapping laws, trapping ethics, techniques in safely releasing non-target animals
  • Firearm safety
  • Wildlife management
  • Proper catch handling

First, you will purchase a registration certificate before taking the online course. The registration certificate is $6 and can be purchased online from a DWR office or any available license agent. Then, you will take the online course and exam. The next step is to find an in-person field day in your area and register on the DWR website. You will need to present the online course-completion document when attending your field day exercise.

(Photo credit: Utah Division of Wildlife Resources)

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Public Comment Sought on RMEF Land Project in Montana

https://www.rmef.org/elk-network/public-comment-sought-on-rmef-land-project-in-montana/

The public is invited to comment on a proposal by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) to acquire the 3,600-acre Seymour Creek parcel in the Big Hole River Watershed.

The existing private landowners are partnering with the Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation (RMEF) and BLM to conserve their family lands in southwest Montana through this Land and Water Conservation Fund acquisition. The comment period for the public to share any issues and concerns that should be considered by the BLM during their environmental assessment planning process to evaluate the impacts of acquiring the acreage will close on August 4, 2022.

The proposed acquisition is about 55 miles south of Butte, in Beaverhead (est. 3,178 acres) and Deerlodge (est. 422 acres) Counites. The Seymour Creek parcel is approximately 13 miles upstream from the confluence of the Big Hole River and Wise River. The area can be accessed via Highway 43, although the property remains in private ownership and is not currently open to the public.

“Acquiring these lands would provide opportunities for increased access for public recreation and management for multiple benefits including maintaining outstanding wildlife and fisheries habitat and ensuring proper watershed function,” said Lindsey Babcock, Butte Field Manager.

“RMEF is excited to work with this traditional Montana ranching family and the BLM to conserve this property that is so important to elk, mule deer, moose, and other wildlife. This project provides an outstanding and diverse conservation and public access opportunity, while alleviating complex public land management,” said Jennifer Doherty, RMEF director of land conservation & access.

To comment on the proposed acquisition, visit the ePlanning website and click on this link to search for the Seymour Creek project.

(Photo credit: Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation)

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What elk diaphragm is the best choice for you?

https://www.rmef.org/elk-network/what-elk-diaphragm-is-the-best-choice-for-you/

Elk season is right around the corner…do you know what elk diaphragm is the best choice for you?

Rocky Mountain Hunting Calls prides itself for offering elk hunters with three different choices of diaphragm frame widths and three different palate or dome heights. The size and shape of your palate (roof of your mouth) will vary slightly from person to person.

Most people can use our medium width frame with medium height dome. The GTP frame is used to build these calls. The most popular calls in the GTP series are: Raging Bull, Black Magic, Mellow Momma, Reaper and Tines Up.

People with a narrow palate, typically also have a higher palate. For those people, we have the TST/Elk101 frame. It is our narrowest frame with our tallest dome. The most popular calls in the TST/Elk101 series are: All-Star, Champ, Rock Star and Contender.

Specialty Diaphragms

While most people into the GTP or TST categories, not everyone does. RMHC has four specialty diaphragms for people with unique palate shapes and sizes.

The Mini Master uses the TST frame, but has a large portion of the tape cut away. This call tends to fit youth the best and people that have a bad gag reflex.

The Remedy uses the original Palate Plate design. The plate is raised slightly, but is flat…there is not arch. This call fits people that have a very shallow palate.

The Wild Fury has a small frame with a slight dome. This call was designed with Kristy Titus to fit women callers.

Herd Master uses our widest frame and the tallest dome. This call fits people with a large mouth/palate.

Studies show that around 10% of the general public have latex allergies to some degree. For those people, using a standard diaphragm is out of the question. RMHC has created a non-latex diaphragm call, Da Bull, that all hunters can use. The medium width frame and medium height dome will fit the majority of callers and is made of non-latex materials.

The Voo Doo cow call was designed to put a spell on the majestic bull elk. With its unique sound board of vented holes and tone quality acrylic barrel, this call will produce realism, accuracy and ease of use in elk call sounds. With its pleading estrus sounds, easy to obtain mews and chirps of both cows and calves will make the Voo Doo hard to beat for calling in your next elk.

The Seducer has a polished black acrylic barrel with the RMEF logo engraved on it. The sound board has 2 holes that create very mellow sounds. The combination of acrylic barrel, sound board and reed produce very clear notes of cow and calf mews and chirps. The Seducer will also make great estrus sounds.

One of the most realistic cow calls ever produced with no-stick response every time. The holes in the “Tone Cap”, can be used to change the tone, pitch, and volume of the call.

Like many of our products there is a wide selection of tubes to pick from.  Each one has it’s own qualities.  Each tube creates different back pressures, tones, and pitches when you add in a diaphragm, or use our conquer mouthpiece or surefire adapter.  The Wapiti Whacker will create all the sounds, even the high pitch screaming challenge, location and display calls of a bull elk. With all of these innovative ideas all wrapped up in one unit, you can now expect the accuracy, realism and ease of use in this Bugle Tube.

The Bully Bull Extreme creates an even flow of air for back pressure and easier to obtain octave note changes.  It has been used by Corey Jacobsen as part of his signature series for several years, and has been a staple product in our bugle tube line.

The Bull Basher Bugle Tube is the first production hybrid bugle tube produced using aluminum mouthpiece and molded barrel. The aluminum mouthpiece and throat create high screaming pitches and more dynamic sounds. It has a new helical “splitter” inserted into the mouth opening to help stabilize air flow, easier octave changes and volume control. The throat design gives optimal back pressure. The short 18” length makes it easy to carry, yet creates great volume and the molded barrel gives deeper growls and chuckles.

We hope that this information is helpful in selecting your elk diaphragm calls this year.

Best of luck in Elk Country!

Team RMHC

For more information visit www.rockymountainhuntingcalls.com

The post What elk diaphragm is the best choice for you? appeared first on Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation.

BACKCOUNTRY THANKSGIVING – A DIY BACKCOUNTRY THANKSGIVING MEAL THAT’S GOOD ENOUGH TO SERVE YOUR INLAWS ON THANKSGIVING DAY!

https://www.rmef.org/elk-network/backcountry-thanksgiving-a-diy-backcountry-thanksgiving-meal-thats-good-enough-to-serve-your-inlaws-on-thanksgiving-day/

A DIY meal designed to fuel you on the mountain without sacrificing quality ingredients. Approximate nutritional value: 698 calories, 114g carbs, 47g protein.

ESTIMATED TIME:

1 – HOUR PREP. 6 – 10 HOURS OF DEHYDRATION.

ESTIMATED SERVINGS:
1 backcountry meal. During prep you can cook/prepare multiple servings at once.

EQUIPMENT NEEDED:

· Saute pan
· Cooking Pot (for blanching)
· Parchment paper (sheets cut to size of dehydrator trays)
· MEAT! 10-Tray Dehydrator
· MEAT! Vacuum Sealer
· MEAT! Vacuum Sealer Bags
· MEAT! Dry Good Digital Scale
· MEAT! Patty Press and Freezer Paper
· MEAT! Cutting Board

INGREDIENTS
Note: Ingredients listed are per serving or individual meal. We recommend cooking in bulk.
· 2t turkey gravy mix
· 3t ranch dressing mix
· 1 oz dried cranberries
· 5 oz of cooked ground turkey
· dehydrated sage
· dehydrated thyme
· 1 chicken bouillon cube
· garlic salt
· 5 cups classic dressing

Directions:
PREP: All ingredients should be cooked to proper/safe temps prior to dehydrating.
With your MEAT! Scale measure 5 – 6 oz of ground turkey and form into patties with the MEAT! Patty Press. (Pro-tip: Put freezer paper onto scale before weighing, add meat, then add another freezer sheet before pressing it. The freezer paper will keep your scale & press clean. (Video demonstration at 36 second mark.)
In a sauté pan cook turkey patties to proper temps. The patties need to be at safe temps and before dehydrating. Add salt and pepper to liking.
Cook venison on medium heat until brown and crumbly, making sure that no large clumps of meat are present. Add salt and pepper to liking.

DEHYDRATING:
Add each individual ingredient to parchment paper. We recommend doing each individual ingredient on its own dehydrator rack. Vegetables and sauce dehydrate better at lower temps (120 – 130°F) and meat at higher temps (158 – 168°F). To save time you can combine all ingredients with proper portion sizes and dehydrate at 165°F.

TURKEY PATTIES: Place patties onto dehydrator trays. Make sure patties are spread out and can get maximum air flow once placed into the dehydrator. Set dehydrator to 158 – 160°F for 4 – 6 hours. With thick patties this may take up to 10 hours, so check every hour after 4. Turkey is done when patties show no signs of moisture and are hard, not rubbery.

SEALING:
In a 6″ x 10″ MEAT! Vacuum Sealer Bag combine turkey patties and 1 bouillon cube.
In a 6″ x 10″ bag vacuum seal your turkey gravy mix.
Combine dressing, dried cranberries, and dehydrated herbs into a MEAT! 8″ x 12″ Vacuum Sealer Bag. Add first two small bags and vacuum.
(Optional) Add food safe silicon bag; this helps capture any unwanted moisture.
Seal with MEAT! Vacuum Sealer.

REHYDRATION:
Bring 2.5 cups of water to a jet boil. Add bouillon cube and turkey patties to boiling water.
Stir and let simmer for 10 minutes. Cover and stir periodically. Once Patties are re-hydrated, dump 2/3 of the liquid and patties into dressing bag. Mix and let sit periodically.
With the remainder of your liquid add turkey gravy mix and stir. Let simmer for a few minutes.
Add gravy to dressing and turkey patties.

The post BACKCOUNTRY THANKSGIVING – A DIY BACKCOUNTRY THANKSGIVING MEAL THAT’S GOOD ENOUGH TO SERVE YOUR INLAWS ON THANKSGIVING DAY! appeared first on Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation.

VENISON RANCH MASHERS – A DIY VENISON POTATO BOWL WITH A COOL RANCH FLAVOR

https://www.rmef.org/elk-network/venison-ranch-mashers-a-diy-venison-potato-bowl-with-a-cool-ranch-flavor/

A DIY meal designed to fuel you on the mountain without sacrificing quality ingredients. Approximate nutritional value: 605 calories, 82g carbs, 53g protein.

ESTIMATED TIME:

1 – HOUR PREP. 6 – 10 HOURS OF DEHYDRATION.

ESTIMATED SERVINGS:

1 backcountry meal. During prep you can cook/prepare multiple servings at once.

EQUIPMENT NEEDED:

· Saute pan
· Cooking Pot (for blanching)
· Strainer
· Parchment paper (sheets cut to size of dehydrator trays)
· MEAT! 10-Tray Dehydrator
· MEAT! Vacuum Sealer
· MEAT! Vacuum Sealer Bags
· MEAT! Dry Good Digital Scale

INGREDIENTS
Note: Ingredients listed are per serving or individual meal. We recommend cooking in bulk.

· 1 & 1/3 cup instant potato flakes
· 3t ranch dressing mix
· 1T ground pepper
· 1/5 cup halved brussels sprouts
· 1/5 cup green peas
· 1/5 cup zucchini
· 1/5 cup yellow squash
· 1/5 cup broccoli
· 5 oz cooked venison (or substitute lean ground beef)

Directions:

PREP: All ingredients should be cooked to proper/safe temps prior to dehydrating.

Blanch broccoli then strain the water and cut broccoli into small pieces. This will help the dehydration process.

Sauté brussels sprouts, zucchini, and yellow squash in a pan until the veggies become tender. Remove from heat and let cool.

Cook venison on medium heat until brown and crumbly making sure that no large clumps of meat are present. Add salt and pepper to liking.

DEHYDRATING:
Add each individual ingredient to parchment paper. We recommend doing each individual ingredient on its own dehydrator rack. Vegetables and sauce dehydrate better at lower temps (120 – 130°F) and meat at higher temps (158 – 168°F). To save time you can combine all ingredients with proper portion sizes and dehydrate at 165°F. (For this recipe you do not need to dehydrate the potato flakes, they are already dehydrated.)

VEGETABLES: With a measuring cup portion about 2T of each vegetable on parchment paper. Make sure veggies are separated and can get maximum air flow once placed into the dehydrator. Set dehydrator to 120 – 130°F for 4 – 6 hours. Veggies are done when they are not chewy and show no signs of moisture.

VENISON: Cut parchment paper to size of dehydrator tray and cover tray; with a MEAT! scale portion 5-6oz of venison; spread venison portion on parchment paper; make sure venison is spread out and can get max air flow once placed into the dehydrator. Set dehydrator at 158-160°F for 4 – 6 hours. Meat is done when crunchy and shows no sign of moisture or chewiness.

SEALING:
Combine portioned ingredients into a MEAT! Vacuum Sealer Bag. (Pro-tip: double bag meals. The dehydration process can create sharp edges and when bags compress tight punctures can occur.)

(Optional) Add food safe silicon bag; this helps capture any unwanted moisture.

Seal with MEAT! Vacuum Sealer.

HOW TO COOK:
Add 1.5 – 2 cups of water in your jet-boil.

Once boiling stir in the dehydrated masher mix, cover and let it simmer for 10 minutes. Stir periodically to evenly rehydrate.

Let it cool for a few minutes and enjoy!

The post VENISON RANCH MASHERS – A DIY VENISON POTATO BOWL WITH A COOL RANCH FLAVOR appeared first on Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation.

BACKCOUNTRY G.O.A.T. MEAL – A DIY DEHYDRATED HIGH PROTEIN OATMEAL

https://www.rmef.org/elk-network/backcountry-g-o-a-t-meal-a-diy-dehydrated-high-protein-oatmeal/

A DIY meal designed to fuel you on the mountain without sacrificing quality ingredients.

ESTIMATED TIME:

30 MINUTES OF PREP.

6 – 10 HOURS OF DEHYDRATION.

ESTIMATED SERVINGS:

1 backcountry meal. During prep you can cook/prepare multiple servings at once.

EQUIPMENT NEEDED:

· Large cooking pot
· Strainer
· Parchment paper
· MEAT! 10-Tray Dehydrator
· MEAT! Vacuum Sealer
· MEAT! Vacuum Sealer Bags
· MEAT! Dry Good Digital Scale

INGREDIENTS
Note: Ingredients listed are per serving or individual meal. We recommend cooking in bulk.
· 1 scoop of protein powder (we used Wilderness Athlete)
· 1/2 cup steel-cut oats
· 1t honey
· 1/2 cup sliced strawberries
· 1/4 cup blueberries
· 1 date

Directions:

PREP: All ingredients should be cooked to proper/safe temps prior to dehydrating.
OATS: Cook your raw steel cut oats in a pot (15-20 minutes). Strain oatmeal from water and get as much moisture out of oats as possible prior to dehydrating.
STRAWBERRIES: Slice strawberries in thin, uniform strips.

DEHYDRATING:
OATS: Add oats to parchment paper; we recommend doing each individual ingredient on its own dehydrator rack; dehydrate at 165°F takes 4-5 hours depending on conditions.
FRUIT: Add thinly sliced strawberries and whole strawberries to dehydrator trays; dehydrate 10-12 hours at 120°F make sure fruit is not chewy and show no signs of moisture.

SEALING:
Combine portioned ingredients into a MEAT! Vacuum Sealer Bag. (Pro-tip: double bag meals. The dehydration process can create sharp edges and when bags compress tight punctures can occur.)
(Optional) Add food safe silicon bag; this helps capture any unwanted moisture.
Seal with MEAT! Vacuum Sealer.

HOW TO COOK:
Add 1.5 – 2 cups of water in your jet-boil.

Once boiling stir in the dehydrated burrito mix, cover and let it simmer for 10 minutes. Stir periodically to evenly rehydrate.

Let it cool for a few minutes and enjoy!

The post BACKCOUNTRY G.O.A.T. MEAL – A DIY DEHYDRATED HIGH PROTEIN OATMEAL appeared first on Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation.