https://www.rmef.org/elk-network/gear-101-browning-recoil-hawg/

There’s no doubt about it. An afternoon at the range sighting in your favorite elk hunting rifle can take a toll, especially when dealing with magnum calibers. After all, they pack a wallop. And it can be even worse if you’re into long stretches of long-range shooting.

To devour the recoil blow, Browning developed one of the most effective muzzle brakes in the outdoor industry.

This is the all-new Recoil Hawg.

Whether you’re talking this Browning X-bolt or, say, a 300 Remington Ultra Magnum, the Recoil Hawg can gobble up recoil and tame muzzle jump by up to 77 percent. 77 percent!

That’s saving your shoulder from a lot of wear and tear while ensuring pinpoint, accurate shot placement.

Here’s how it works. Specially designed directional porting blows gases up and to the sides and that, combined with closed bottom design, minimizes dust signature.

Constructed of rugged steel, the multi-caliber design fits most rifle barrels .30 caliber or smaller thanks to a 5/8ths-inch-24 TPI, or threads per inch, or a ½-inch-28 TPI threaded muzzle.

And installation is a breeze.

If you can screw in a lightbulb, you can install the Recoil Hawg.

Place the muzzle brake over the end of your rifle barrel, grab the threaded collar and put it inside the Hawg casing and thread it on. Then use the installation tool to tighten. It comes off that easy too.

What makes this set-up especially great for elk hunting is the simple fact that the Recoil Hawg’s performance translates into the field.

Muzzle jump is so limited that it keeps a hunter looking downrange at his or her target…not trying to regain their senses and scrambling to place the crosshairs back on their quarry in case a second shot is needed.

Available in burnt bronze, matte black or a silver finish, the Recoil Hawg is as attractive as it is effective.

Learn more at: Browning North America

The post Gear 101 – Browning Recoil Hawg appeared first on Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation.

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