https://www.rmef.org/elk-network/gear-101-trail-camera-guide-stealth-cam-wgi-muddy/

It’s easy to get overwhelmed by all the different types of game cameras on the market today. But you can cut through some of that noise when you look at it this way—all types of hunting are different, and there’s a good game camera for each of those situations. 

If you’re lucky enough to be the hunter chasing that monster midwestern whitetail on your back 40, you probably know right where you could place one or two high-end game cameras to capture a lot of action. For you, the Stealth Cam DS4k Transit cellular camera is one to check out. This camera lets you see in real time what’s walking around on your property even when you aren’t there, when you pair it with the Stealth Cam Command Pro app. For $299 plus a super affordable cellular Data plan, 100% certified through Verizon or AT&T, you’ll have the ultimate in cellular game cam quality and reliability. If you’re planning on tracking antler growth from year to year, the photos from this 32-megapixel camera and 4k video of the Transit will show enough detail that you should practically be able to estimate a Boone and Crockett score right from your device. Plus, there’s a .2 second trigger speed and 100-foot detection range. If it’s out there, you’re not going to miss it with this camera. One of the best parts – if you’re only interested in putting out a camera at certain times each year, that’s not a problem. You can freeze your cellular subscription when you aren’t using the cameras, so you won’t be billed for what you don’t need.  

Maybe you’re listening to all this info on cellular plans and thinking, “my hunting spot doesn’t even have cell service.” If you’re a backcountry public-land hunter headed off the grid to hunt miles and miles of mountain, there’s still a game camera for you. There are plenty of non-cellular game camera options out there, and a good model to consider is the Muddy PRO CAM 24MP for around $90. When you’re venturing into the deepest areas where you think the biggest bull elk hide, you probably need to put out a half-dozen or more noncellular game cameras that’ll cast a wide net and let you scout what’s out there, without stressing about your bank account balance. This reasonably priced, 24-megapixel camera takes 720 videos with an 80-foot detection range and a .5 second trigger speed. 

Maybe you’re somewhere in the middle and you’d like to have a handful of options that won’t break the bank, but still give you a great quality photo or video. For you, Wild Game Innovations’ Encounter 2.0 or Mirage 2.0 would be great to check out. These two cameras offer quality cellular and noncellular options at a moderate price – average prices are $150 for the Encounter 2.0 and $120 for the Mirage 2.0. The WGI Encounter 2.0 is a 26-megapixel cellular camera with a .4 second trigger speed and 80-foot detection range. With this camera you can take 720p videos and upload HD photos and video when you pair the camera with the HuntSmart app, and you can still get photos of the back 40 with the available cellular data plan. The Mirage 2.0 is a good middle of the road noncellular camera for those who might want a bit higher resolution photo or video on that wallow. With a 30-megapixel camera, 720p video capabilities and a .5 second trigger speed, this camera gets the job done for a judicious price.  

Remember, picking the right game camera option is different for every hunter and every type of hunting. Hopefully this has given you a good place to start. 

Learn more at: Stealth Cam, Wildame Innovations, Muddy

The post Gear 101 – Trail Camera Guide – Stealth Cam, WGI, Muddy appeared first on Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation.

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